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Thursday, September 3, 2009

Universal Children Day (October 4, 1971)

The format of the stamp is horizontal. The foreground shows a young boy in a striped red and yellow shirt holding a pink toy train, while a real electric train in yellow and green colours crosses a bridge in the background. The idea signifies and illustrates the caption “YOUNG HUMAN RESOURCES: THE KEY TO NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT. These words are in yellow against the dark green colour of the arch. Immediately below this line, appear the words “UNIVERSAL CHILDREN DAY—4TH OCT. 1971” in white. The words “ PAKISTAN” in English, Urdu and Bengali are in white against a red strip at the bottom of the stamp. The value “20-PAISA” and word “POSTAGE” are in white and appear immediately to the left of the forehead of the figure of the young boy.
Every year a special theme is chosen by the UNICEF and the International Union for Child Welfare to focus atten-tion on the special need of the children. This year the theme is ‘Young human resources : The key to National Development’. This theme stresses the need to develop the talents, skills and abilities of children all over the world.The format of the stamp is horizontal. The foreground shows a young boy in a striped red and yellow shirt holding a pink toy train, while a real electric train in yellow and green colours crosses a bridge in the background. The idea signifies and illustrates the caption “YOUNG HUMAN RESOURCES: THE KEY TO NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT. These words are in yellow against the dark green colour of the arch. Immediately below this line, appear the words “UNIVERSAL CHILDREN DAY—4TH OCT. 1971” in white. The words “ PAKISTAN” in English, Urdu and Bengali are in white against a red strip at the bottom of the stamp. The value “20-PAISA” and word “POSTAGE” are in white and appear immediately to the left of the forehead of the figure of the young boy.The format of the stamp is horizontal. The foreground shows a young boy in a striped red and yellow shirt holding a pink toy train, while a real electric train in yellow and green colours crosses a bridge in the background. The idea signifies and illustrates the caption “YOUNG HUMAN RESOURCES: THE KEY TO NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT. These words are in yellow against the dark green colour of the arch. Immediately below this line, appear the words “UNIVERSAL CHILDREN DAY—4TH OCT. 1971” in white. The words “ PAKISTAN” in English, Urdu and Bengali are in white against a red strip at the bottom of the stamp. The value “20-PAISA” and word “POSTAGE” are in white and appear immediately to the left of the forehead of the figure of the young boy.The format of the stamp is horizontal. The foreground shows a young boy in a striped red and yellow shirt holding a pink toy train, while a real electric train in yellow and green colours crosses a bridge in the background. The idea signifies and illustrates the caption “YOUNG HUMAN RESOURCES: THE KEY TO NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT. These words are in yellow against the dark green colour of the arch. Immediately below this line, appear the words “UNIVERSAL CHILDREN DAY—4TH OCT. 1971” in white. The words “ PAKISTAN” in English, Urdu and Bengali are in white against a red strip at the bottom of the stamp. The value “20-PAISA” and word “POSTAGE” are in white and appear immediately to the left of the forehead of the figure of the young boy.The format of the stamp is horizontal. The foreground shows a young boy in a striped red and yellow shirt holding a pink toy train, while a real electric train in yellow and green colours crosses a bridge in the background. The idea signifies and illustrates the caption “YOUNG HUMAN RESOURCES: THE KEY TO NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT. These words are in yellow against the dark green colour of the arch. Immediately below this line, appear the words “UNIVERSAL CHILDREN DAY—4TH OCT. 1971” in white. The words “ PAKISTAN” in English, Urdu and Bengali are in white against a red strip at the bottom of the stamp. The value “20-PAISA” and word “POSTAGE” are in white and appear immediately to the left of the forehead of the figure of the young boy.
Every year a special theme is chosen by the UNICEF and the International Union for Child Welfare to focus atten-tion on the special need of the children. This year the theme is ‘Young human resources : The key to National Development’. This theme stresses the need to develop the talents, skills and abilities of children all over the world.
To commemorate this occasion, Pakis-tan Post Office is issuing a stamp of 20-Paisa denomination on October 4, 1971.
Universal Children’s Day received formal recognition by the United Na-tions in 1954 resolution passed by the General Assembly calling for a “day of worldwide fraternity and understanding among children In celebrating Children’s Day this year, it is vital to demonstrate in every way possible the close inter-relationship that exists between national development and child development. The children are a country’s greatest wealth and deve-loping their potential is the surest road to self-sustaining economic growth. One of the crucial factors in the progress of a country is the development of the child, the human capital of any community and the adult of tomorrow-to-morrow’s engineers, doctors, progressive farmers teachers, scientists, social lea-ders. That is the great task in which all must take a share and solemnly recog-nise that the welfare of today’s children is inseparably linked with the peace and progress and prosperity of tomorrow’s world.
in the modern, technical world, it is not enough to have the technical ‘know-how’, most vital are the motiva-tions, the attitudes and the work habits formed in the early years of childhood. The proper development of the child can determine the productiveness of hu-man resources of each nation. It is now generally accepted that development is ‘growth’ plus ‘change’; preparing a child for life means not only helping him to grow, but also equipping him for change. Accordingly the child is not only the ‘object’ but also the ‘agent’ of the plan.
On Monday, October 4, 1971, when celebrating Universal Children’s Day, special thought needs be given to the importance of the first few years of a child’s life. Giving him a good start in life is the most worth while investment one can make in our country’s future.
Every year a special theme is chosen by the UNICEF and the International Union for Child Welfare to focus atten-tion on the special need of the children. This year the theme is ‘Young human resources : The key to National Development’. This theme stresses the need to develop the talents, skills and abilities of children all over the world. To commemorate this occasion, Pakis-tan Post Office is issuing a stamp of 20-Paisa denomination on October 4, 1971. Universal Children’s Day received formal recognition by the United Na-tions in 1954 resolution passed by the General Assembly calling for a “day of worldwide fraternity and understan-ding among children In celebrating Children’s Day this year, it is vital to demonstrate in every way possible the close inter-relationship that exists between national development and child development. The children are a country’s greatest wealth and deve-loping their potential is the surest road to self-sustaining economic growth. One of the crucial factors in the progress of a country is the development of the child, the human capital of any community and the adult of tomorrow-to-morrow’s engineers, doctors, progressive farmers teachers, scientists, social lea-ders. That is the great task in which all must take a share and solemnly recog-nise that the welfare of today’s children is inseparably linked with the peace and progress and prosperity of tomorrow’s world. in the modern, technical world, it is not enough to have the technical ‘know-how’, most vital are the motiva-tions, the attitudes and the work habits formed in the early years of childhood. The proper development of the child can determine the productiveness of hu-man resources of each nation. It is now generally accepted that development is ‘growth’ plus ‘change’; preparing a child for life means not only helping him to grow, but also equipping him for change. Accordingly the child is not only the ‘object’ but also the ‘agent’ of the plan. On Monday, October 4, 1971, when celebrating Universal Children’s Day, special thought needs be given to the importance of the first few years of a child’s life. Giving him a good start in life is the most worth while investment one can make in our country’s future. Every year a special theme is chosen by the UNICEF and the International Union for Child Welfare to focus atten-tion on the special need of the children. This year the theme is ‘Young human resources : The key to National Development’. This theme stresses the need to develop the talents, skills and abilities of children all over the world. To commemorate this occasion, Pakis-tan Post Office is issuing a stamp of 20-Paisa denomination on October 4, 1971. Universal Children’s Day received formal recognition by the United Na-tions in 1954 resolution passed by the General Assembly calling for a “day of worldwide fraternity and understan-ding among children In celebrating Children’s Day this year, it is vital to demonstrate in every way possible the close inter-relationship that exists between national development and child development. The children are a country’s greatest wealth and deve-loping their potential is the surest road to self-sustaining economic growth. One of the crucial factors in the progress of a country is the development of the child, the human capital of any community and the adult of tomorrow-to-morrow’s engineers, doctors, progressive farmers teachers, scientists, social lea-ders. That is the great task in which all must take a share and solemnly recog-nise that the welfare of today’s children is inseparably linked with the peace and progress and prosperity of tomorrow’s world. in the modern, technical world, it is not enough to have the technical ‘know-how’, most vital are the motiva-tions, the attitudes and the work habits formed in the early years of childhood. The proper development of the child can determine the productiveness of hu-man resources of each nation. It is now generally accepted that development is ‘growth’ plus ‘change’; preparing a child for life means not only helping him to grow, but also equipping him for change. Accordingly the child is not only the ‘object’ but also the ‘agent’ of the plan. On Monday, October 4, 1971, when celebrating Universal Children’s Day, special thought needs be given to the importance of the first few years of a child’s life. Giving him a good start in life is the most worth while investment one can make in our country’s future. Every year a special theme is chosen by the UNICEF and the International Union for Child Welfare to focus atten-tion on the special need of the children. This year the theme is ‘Young human resources : The key to National Development’. This theme stresses the need to develop the talents, skills and abilities of children all over the world. To commemorate this occasion, Pakis-tan Post Office is issuing a stamp of 20-Paisa denomination on October 4, 1971. Universal Children’s Day received formal recognition by the United Na-tions in 1954 resolution passed by the General Assembly calling for a “day of worldwide fraternity and understan-ding among children In celebrating Children’s Day this year, it is vital to demonstrate in every way possible the close inter-relationship that exists between national development and child development. The children are a country’s greatest wealth and deve-loping their potential is the surest road to self-sustaining economic growth. One of the crucial factors in the progress of a country is the development of the child, the human capital of any community and the adult of tomorrow-to-morrow’s engineers, doctors, progressive farmers teachers, scientists, social lea-ders. That is the great task in which all must take a share and solemnly recog-nise that the welfare of today’s children is inseparably linked with the peace and progress and prosperity of tomorrow’s world. in the modern, technical world, it is not enough to have the technical ‘know-how’, most vital are the motiva-tions, the attitudes and the work habits formed in the early years of childhood. The proper development of the child can determine the productiveness of hu-man resources of each nation. It is now generally accepted that development is ‘growth’ plus ‘change’; preparing a child for life means not only helping him to grow, but also equipping him for change. Accordingly the child is not only the ‘object’ but also the ‘agent’ of the plan. On Monday, October 4, 1971, when celebrating Universal Children’s Day, special thought needs be given to the importance of the first few years of a child’s life. Giving him a good start in life is the most worth while investment one can make in our country’s future. To commemorate this occasion, Pakis-tan Post Office is issuing a stamp of 20-Paisa denomination on October 4, 1971. Universal Children’s Day received formal recognition by the United Na-tions in 1954 resolution passed by the General Assembly calling for a “day of worldwide fraternity and understan-ding among children In celebrating Children’s Day this year, it is vital to demonstrate in every way possible the close inter-relationship that exists between national development and child development. The children are a country’s greatest wealth and deve-loping their potential is the surest road to self-sustaining economic growth. One of the crucial factors in the progress of a country is the development of the child, the human capital of any community and the adult of tomorrow-to-morrow’s engineers, doctors, progressive farmers teachers, scientists, social lea-ders. That is the great task in which all must take a share and solemnly recog-nise that the welfare of today’s children is inseparably linked with the peace and progress and prosperity of tomorrow’s world. in the modern, technical world, it is not enough to have the technical ‘know-how’, most vital are the motiva-tions, the attitudes and the work habits formed in the early years of childhood. The proper development of the child can determine the productiveness of hu-man resources of each nation. It is now generally accepted that development is ‘growth’ plus ‘change’; preparing a child for life means not only helping him to grow, but also equipping him for change. Accordingly the child is not only the ‘object’ but also the ‘agent’ of the plan. On Monday, October 4, 1971, when celebrating Universal Children’s Day, special thought needs be given to the importance of the first few years of a child’s life. Giving him a good start in life is the most worth while investment one can make in our country’s future.